powered by FreeFind

Home > Publications > Periodicals > Scottish Literary Review
 



 

 
From issue 5/1 (Spring/Summer 2013), Scottish Literary Review is available electronically via Project MUSE.

 

SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW

ISSN 1756-5634
2 issues per year


(formerly the Scottish Literary Journal, 1974–2000; Scottish Studies Review, 2000–2008)

Edited by: Gerard Carruthers (University of Glasgow)
Review Editor: Scott Lyall (Napier University)


 
Individual subscription rates – 2 issues per year
(ASLS members receive Scottish Literary Review as part of their membership package.)
  • For Institutional subscription rates, please contact ASLS.


  • Scottish Literary Review is the premier journal of Scottish literature and literary studies. With literature at its heart, Scottish Literary Review publishes critical and scholarly articles and reviews.

    Scottish Literary Review has a distinguished international editorial board which includes many major scholars of Scottish culture. The Journal is published twice per year.

    With the establishment of Scottish Studies centres in Scotland, Europe and North America, Scottish Literary Review is positioned internationally as the leading journal in this field.

    • All submissions to Scottish Literary Review should conform to MHRA style. All submissions will be peer-reviewed; the normal word-limit for articles is 7,000 words (including endnotes). Click here for detailed author guidelines.

    Papers published in Scottish Literary Review are abstracted and indexed in Academic Search Complete (EBSCO) and Cengage (Thomson Gale).

    Books for review should be sent to:

    Dr Scott Lyall
    Reviews Editor, Scottish Literary Review
    School of Arts and Creative Industries
    Edinburgh Napier University
    10 Colinton Road
    Edinburgh EH10 5DT
    UK

    Advisory Board

    • Professor Ian Brown (Kingston University, London)
    • Professor Cairns Craig (University of Aberdeen)
    • Professor Robert Crawford (University of St Andrews)
    • Professor Leith Davis (Simon Fraser University)
    • Professor Robert Dunbar (University of Edinburgh)
    • Professor Ian Duncan (University of California, Berkeley)
    • Professor Nancy Gish (University of Maine)
    • Professor R. D. S. Jack (University of Edinburgh)
    • Dr Aaron Kelly (University of Edinburgh)
    • Professor Caroline McCracken-Flesher (University of Wyoming)
    • Professor Glenda Norquay (John Moores University, Liverpool)
    • Professor Alessandra Petrina (Università degli Studi di Padova)
    • Professor Murray Pittock (University of Glasgow)
    • Professor Alan Riach (University of Glasgow)
    • Professor Richard Sher (NJIT/Rutgers)
    • Professor Fiona Stafford (Somerville College, Oxford)
    • Professor Roderick Watson (University of Stirling)

     

    Articles published in Scottish Literary Review:

    Click on the titles to read the articles on Project MUSE
    (requires an institutional subscription to Project MUSE)

     
    Show abstracts
    Vol/No. Date
    Title Author

    6/2

    2014

    Translation, Power and Gender in Thomas Hudson’s Historie of Judith
    Drawing on Translation Studies and gender theory, this article investigates the problematic translation of Bartas’s La Judit (1574) and its assimilation to Jacobean Scotland. Commissioned by James VI, Thomas Hudson’s Historie of Judith (1584) endeavoured to impose a Protestant female behavioural model for ladies at court after the troublesome regency of Marie de Guise and reign of Mary Queen of Scots. By analysing the construction of female identity, femininity and sexuality and by discussing the nearly impossible reconciliation of power and female agency, I shall elucidate the way in which Hudson’s translation operates as an intended vehicle for gender and political domination.

    Sergi Mainer

    6/2

    2014

    James Morison, Book Illustration and The Poems of Robert Burns (1812)
    This article introduces a little studied edition of the poetical works of Robert Burns that was issued, early in 1812, under the auspices of the Perth publishing firm of the late James Morison. It contextualises the edition in light of the Morison firm’s publishing programme promoting a cultural-patriotic canon of Scottish literature, while at the same time embedding it within developments in the production of the illustrated Scottish book at the end of the eighteenth century. Related to the Morisons’ earlier examples of illustrated editions (such as the volumes of the poems of Ossian and James Thomson), the two-volume Poetical Works of Robert Burns are shown to have been issued in a competitive environment in which Robert Cromek, Burns’s editor, together with painter-book illustrator, Thomas Stothard, also sought to produce an illustrated edition of Burns of their own – an edition which only materialised two years after the publication of the Morisons’.

    Sandro Jung

    6/2

    2014

    Peatland and the Ulster-Scottish Culture of North-East Ireland in Thomas Beggs’s Rathlin
    Peatland is a physical habitat, once of great abundance in Ireland, which has deep-rooted cultural associations with Ireland and the native Irish. Gaelic Irish, colonial, and Anglo-Irish literary engagements with bogland in Ireland appear to be well documented. Yet few critical studies have examined attitudes to Irish peatland in Ulster-Scots writing. This essay examines representations of peatland in the farthermost north-east region of Ulster, in a seminal poem, Rathlin (1820), by one of the foremost, labouring-class Ulster-Scots writers of the Romantic era, Thomas Beggs. This essay unearths evidence of underlying associations between Ulster-Scottish culture in north-east Ireland and depictions of the area’s peatland habitats, in Beggs’s poem Rathlin.

    David Gray

    6/2

    2014

    Politics and Art: James Kelman’s Not Not While the Giro
    This essay seeks to make and substantiate a bold claim: that Not Not While the Giro, published in 1983, is the most distinguished set of short stories issued in the United Kingdom since World War Two. Furthermore, even if other collections – by Sylvia Townshend Warner, Elizabeth Bowen, John Fowles, V. S. Pritchett, Alan Sillitoe, Elizabeth Taylor, and Angela Carter, for example – were felt to be of greater artistic merit, Kelman’s should still be regarded as the most important, capturing as it does with an urgency worthy of its subject the decline of working-class male culture in the ‘postindustrial’ Britain in the last quarter of the twentieth century. This discussion sees the collection in very general evaluative terms, therefore. In particular, before it turns to Kelman’s stories in detail, it needs to establish the political and aesthetic background to their success, and to explore how the political and the aesthetic ultimately found their places and proportions in his achievement.

    Richard Lansdown

    6/2

    2014

    ‘[You can’t kill me]’: Scottish Identity and the Anglo-Scottish Union in David Greig’s Dunsinane
    There have been an increasing number of Scottish plays dealing with Scottish history, national identity, and independence, especially following the devolution in 1999 and the announcement of the referendum. These plays focusing on recent political issues such as the Union, the devolution, and Scotland’s break with the United Kingdom have shown the extent to which theatre has become an important forum and alternative site for dialogue about Scottish independence. One such play is David Greig’s Dunsinane (2010), a sequel to Shakespeare’s Macbeth (1605–6) supporting the Union of 1603. In contrast to Shakespeare, however, Dunsinane appears to argue for Scottish independence. This article will focus on how the Macbeth story has been reinterpreted to challenge the misrepresentation of Scottish history by Shakespeare, and invite the audience to re-think Anglo-Scottish relations. In addition to relating a more accurate history and representation of eleventh-century Scottish history, Greig uses geographical, cultural and linguistic differences between England and Scotland to comment on Scotland’s selfgovernance, freedom and future. Although the play was composed in 2010, it clearly captures the cultural and political feelings of independence that gave way to the announcement of the referendum.

    Sila Şenlen Güvenç

    6/2

    2014

    ‘Two Syllables Only’: Hailes, Mallet and Scottish literary anxiety in the age of Enlightenment
    The Scottish literati of the latter half of the eighteenth century, as well as punching above their weight in the intellectual life of Europe, were also prone to tensions and antagonisms within their own circle. Contributing to this internal friction was an anxiety to conform to English standards of speech and language without seeming ashamed of their unique patrimony and bruising their national pride: Scots frequently attacked one another for having failed on one or other of those accounts. A passage from a 1763 letter to James Boswell reveals one such squabble between two relatively neglected literary Scots, Sir David Dalrymple of Hailes (1726–1792) and David Mallet (ne Malloch). An exploration of this spat affords a wider view of Scottish literary connections, accomplishments and anxieties, and demonstrates that heat as well as light was generated from the creative energy of the Scottish Enlightenment.

    Mark McLean

    6/2

    2014

    Thomas Crawford, 1920–2014

    J. Derrick McClure

    6/2

    2014

    Book Reviews section

     

    6/1

    2014

    Montrose and Modern Memory: the literary after-life of the first marquis of Montrose
    By addressing the ways in which historical and fictional texts from the mid-seventeenth century to the present have depicted the first marquis of Montrose (1612–1650), this article emphasises the influence of religious partisanship on Scottish historiography; the distorting lens that Romanticism offered to those seeking to understand the religious and national trauma of the covenanting wars; the influence of pre-1745 events on the interests of Victorian literary Jacobitism; the impact of populism on the cult of Montrose; and the revisionism of twentieth and twenty-first century texts that question the dichotomy of cavalier and covenant presented by earlier writers and suggest a subversive reading of the heroism evoked in conventional appreciations of the life of the marquis.

    Catriona M. M. MacDonald

    6/1

    2014

    Angels, Dancers, Mermaids: The Hidden History of Peckham in Muriel Spark’s The Ballad of Peckham Rye
    What led Muriel Spark, who is generally regarded as an author alive to the imaginative possibilities of milieu, to set The Ballad of Peckham Rye in a drab south London suburb? This essay examines Spark’s acerbic representation of suburban modernity through the lenses of urban, cultural, and folk history. Viewed through these multiple prisms, the homogenised space of Spark’s novel reveals a latent disruptive reserve that unexpectedly aligns it with some of the most dynamic aspects of Scottish tradition.

    Jan Gorak

    6/1

    2014

    Invisible Ink: Links and Continuities in Douglas Dunn’s Oeuvre
    Douglas Dunn published his latest poetry pamphlet, Invisible Ink, in 2011. While it continues familiar themes and motifs that he introduced much earlier in his poetry, it is also a lyrical appendix to The Year’s Afternoon (2000), his last full collection. This essay describes instances and forms of dialogicity between domestic allegiances and large-scale temporalities within his oeuvre while the poems record a growing disengagement from social issues. Dunn’s tone ranges from weary nostalgia to sharp self-irony even as he paints uncompromisingly candid images of increasing existential alienation from the familiar environment which has been his main source of lyrical consolation.

    Attila Dósa

    6/1

    2014

    Changing Perspectives: Translations of Scottish Twentieth-Century Poetry into German
    This essay explores the implications of perspectivity for translating, and reading translations of, Scottish twentieth-century poetry. After outlining the general role of perspectivity and perspective change in translation, it focuses on issues of language and culture, using Iain Galbraith’s 2011 anthology Beredter Norden as an example. In particular, it discusses ways of dealing with the heteroglossia of Scottish poetry (English, Scots and its dialects, and Gaelic) and with various types of reference to Scottish culture. The theoretical basis is a functional approach to translation, which can accommodate different translation strategies depending on the goal(s) pursued.

    Susanne Hagemann

    6/1

    2014

    ‘I may perhaps have said this’: Samuel Johnson and Newhailes Library
    The library of Sir David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes, at Newhailes House is regularly associated with an unsubstantiated quote from Samuel Johnson who supposedly described it as ‘the most learned drawing-room in Europe’. Though the veracity of the association is never likely to be proven, this essay considers: the development of the library; Lord Hailes’s interactions with his peers; and contemporary references to his collection. How Johnson may have interpreted Lord Hailes’s character is also considered in order to judge whether there is at least a reasonable basis for the association.

    Robert L. Betteridge

    6/1

    2014

    A Note on Walter Scott & Irish Literature
    The eighteenth century Irish poet Charles Henry Wilson is little known, but in 1782 he produced the first printed translation from Irish to English, Poems Translated from the Irish Language into the English. Walter Scott’s extensive collection of rare and curious Irish material has received little scholarly attention to date, but it contains one of the only two surviving copies of this work.

    Lindsay Levy

    6/1

    2014

    Professor Susan Manning, 1953–2013

    Penny Fielding

    6/1

    2014

    Professor G. Ross Roy, 1924–2013

    Ronnie Young

    6/1

    2014

    Dr Kenneth Simpson, 1943–2013

    Patrick Scott

    6/1

    2014

    The Year’s Publications for 2013: A Selected List

    Christopher McMillan, Jonathan Henderson, Stewart Alexander Sanderson

    6/1

    2014

    The John Galt Society

    Ian McGhee and Gerry Carruthers

    5/2

    2013

    Reflections on Staging Sir David Lyndsay’s Satire of the Three Estates at Linlithgow Palace, June 2013
    This article reflects on the discoveries gained from performing the full text of Sir David Lyndsay’s A Satire of the Three Estates at Linlithgow Palace in June 2013 as part of the AHRC-funded ‘Staging and Representing the Scottish Renaissance Court’ project. It describes the nature and aims of the project, and discusses the ways in which recreating the production suggests rather different conclusions about the nature of the play to those created by the seminal revival, directed by Tyrone Guthrie for the Edinburgh International Festival of 1948. By contrasting the two productions, the essay suggests ways in which staging the full text allows rather different political and dramaturgical agenda to emerge to those embraced by Guthrie’s necessarily circumscribed version. In particular the role of Pauper emerges as a far more significant and radical figure, capable, like the play as a whole, of addressing contemporary issues and anxieties as powerfully in 2013 as it seems to have done in 1552 and 1554.

    Greg Walker

    5/2

    2013

    ‘He is ane Haly Freir’: The Freiris of Berwik, The Summoner’s Tale, and the Tradition of Anti-Fraternal Satire
    This essay explores the relationship of the fifteenth-century Scottish fabliau, The Freiris of Berwik, to the tradition of anti-fraternal satire. The tale’s depiction of the sinfulness of friars, the central motor of the plot, and the principle source of its comedy, might suggest that the narrative belongs to this literary tradition which from the middle of the thirteenth century pilloried the orders of friars for their supposed moral laxity. The essay compares The Freiris of Berwik to Chaucer’s Summoner’s Tale, which seamlessly brings together fabliau and anti-fraternal satire, using broad fabliau comedy not only to ridicule and disparage the corruption of friars, but to provoke feelings of indignation at their conduct. In the light of this comparison, the treatment of friars in the Scottish tale emerges as more ironic than satirical, suggesting that The Freiris of Berwik is concerned with eliciting laughter as an end in itself, rather than deploying this laughter to advance an anti-clerical, or more specifically an anti-fraternal, agenda.

    David Salter

    5/2

    2013

    From Midden Fecht to Civil War: Drummond of Hawthornden’s Polemo-Middinia
    This essay presents the case for William Drummond of Hawthornden’s disputed authorship of the seventeenth-century comic, ‘macaronic’ poem, Polemo-Middinia by means of detailed examination of early editions and manuscript versions of the poem. In so doing, it offers a new historical contextualisation of the poem, identifying the pseudonymous names of its main protagonists to show that they were not entirely fictitious but rooted in a contemporary dispute about land. This involved Sir John Scot of Scotstarvit (1585–1670), a renowned patron of culture in early modern Scotland. In addition, the essay suggests that Drummond’s decision to revise and publish the work a considerable period after its first creation was based on him seeing in it a new coded political message relevant to the contemporary civil war. A remarkable anomaly in the Scottish print culture of the period, the poem’s appearance in the years of ‘the troubles’ sheds new light on Drummond’s political and intellectual position at this time, as well as his diversity as a writer.

    David Stevenson

    5/2

    2013

    The Love Songs and Love Lyrics of Robert Burns and John Clare
    The essay argues that John Clare follows the precedent of Robert Burns in writing love poems about a number of different female figures. Burns was a vital and enabling touchstone for Clare in terms of the wit and pathos of his love songs and love lyrics, even as it is often the case that Clare’s poems dramatise a painful failure to communicate with these female figures. Poems from across Clare’s body of writing are analysed here but particular attention is paid to his later verse: it is during this period that we see some of his most skilful imitations of Burns’s vocabulary and voice. The two poets are, furthermore, contextualised through a consideration of some of Clare’s prose statements about Burns and about a wider Scottish tradition of song. The essay is one of the first sustained comparisons of the poems of Burns and Clare, and the readings of the texts in question show that Burns’s work also gave Clare a model for combining song and lyric in distinctive kinds of ways.

    Adam White

    5/2

    2013

    George Mackay Brown’s Marian Apocrypha: Iconography and Enculturation in Time in a Red Coat
    This essay seeks to establish the influence of Mariology and Marian iconography on the works of George Mackay Brown, with particular reference to his late novel Time in a Red Coat. It discusses Marian devotion in Brown’s Orcadian context, and notes in particular chapel dedications, place names and folk song, before examining the enculturation of Mary and her place in global culture and Catholic history. Some of Brown’s other unpublished, or ‘apocryphal’ writings on Mary are also discussed, as these pave the way for his longer prose meditation on Mariology in the novel. The essay brings these observations to bear on Time in a Red Coat – the high point of Brown’s Marion oeuvre, which has not yet been read by critics in terms of Brown’s Catholic imagination. The essay ends by examining the intertextual links between the Book of Revelation and Time in a Red Coat.

    Linden Bicket

    5/2

    2013

    Book Reviews section

     

    5/1

    2013

    A Note on Sir William Alexander and Edmund Waller
    Alexander’s eight couplets on Prince Charles’s return from Spain are strikingly close in style to Waller’s poem on Charles’s escape from drowning off Santander. Either Alexander was a remarkable trendspotter as well as gifted literary imitator, or he anticipated Waller’s refinements of the pentameter couplet and graceful turning of antithesis and mythological conceits, which Dryden praised and assimilated to his literary manner. The latter alternative need not mean that Waller imitated Alexander, only that the Scots, beginning with James’s Reuelis and Cautelis and followed by Ayton, Alexander and Mackenzie, were helping to tread a path that became the thoroughfare of English Augustan verse.

    David Reid

    5/1

    2013

    Robert Burns and Maciej Kazimierz Sarbiewski: A Translatological Investigation into the Mystery of ‘I dream’d I lay’
    The article attempts to retrace the connections between an early lyric of Robert Burns, ‘I dream’d I lay’, the song ‘The Flowers of the Forest’ by Alicia Cockburn (1713–94) and the poem of Maciej Kazimierz Sarbiewski (1595–1640) entitled ‘Ad suam testudinem’. The article includes a brief account of the available knowledge concerning Burns’s poem, its dating and history of publication. It presents the two possible sources of influence upon the poet, discussing his possible access to the texts and their respective popularity in late eighteenth-century Scotland. The paper concludes that Burns became acquainted with the two poems in question in his early teens. Even though he failed to acknowledge the connection, they most probably influenced him when some years later he set out to compose his short poem, one of the first he ever wrote.

    Krzysztof Fordoński

    5/1

    2013

    ‘Luve’s arcane delirium’: A Reading of Sydney Goodsir Smith’s Under the Eildon Tree
    Sydney Goodsir Smith’s sequence of twenty-four elegies on themes of loss, love and creativity, widely regarded to be Smith’s masterwork, has nevertheless divided critical opinion since its first publication in 1948. One of the most recent calls for fresh critical attention was made in 2005 by Christopher Whyte, who wrote that ‘Smith’s work merits and demands (and still awaits) thoroughgoing and meticulous annotation and assessment’. This current re-reading of Under the Eildon Tree approaches the text from three connected angles: the Bakhtinian carnivalesque and debauchery that runs through the sequence; the idiolect employed by Smith; and the poem’s vital engagement with intertexts leading to an assessment of the rhetorical nature of love poetry and elegy.

    Richie McCaffery

    5/1

    2013

    From Slate to Jupiter: Poetic Patterns of Edwin Morgan’s Sonnets from Scotland
    This paper seeks to investigate a Scottish response to the European tradition of the sonnet in the poems of Edwin Morgan in his Sonnets from Scotland. A close study of various poems allows the establishment of the extent to which Morgan’s sonnets deviate from the Petrarchan/Shakespearian patterns not only in their formal arrangement but also in their content. The sonnet’s thematic variety, the arrangement of space and time, the construction of the poetic persona show that Morgan’s cycle is public rather than private, metapoetic rather than lyrical, hybridlike rather than canonical.

    Slawomir Wacior

    5/1

    2013

    Liz Lochhead Translated: A First Bibliography
    Translation of works by Liz Lochhead started as early as 1983. By 2010, ninety of her poems, performance pieces, and plays had been translated into eighteen languages and published in twenty countries on three continents. The two target languages in which the largest number of Lochhead texts has appeared are Italian and German. In all, there are almost 150 translations, but they seem to be virtually unknown. It is this gap in Lochhead research that the present bibliography is intended to fill. However, given the difficulty of locating translations that are not listed in the standard sources, the bibliography will necessarily be provisional.

    Susanne Hagemann

    5/1

    2013

    Re-representing Representations in Janice Galloway’s Foreign Parts
    This essay seeks to examine Janice Galloway’s second novel Foreign Parts (1994) as a subversive text whose apparent light-heartedness conceals a powerful challenge to historical and cultural modes of portraying femininity. The author aims in particular at contesting the representation of the female body as an object of desire generated by the male gaze. While the absence of an immediate Scottish setting in the text proposes to foreground female concerns in their own rights, Galloway also employs a stock device of Scottish literature – the doubling pattern – to depict the unique but largely neglected subject of female bonding.

    Ewa Szymańska-Sabala

    5/1

    2013

    Tartan Noir, or, Hard-Boiled Heidegger
    This essay takes up the genre of Tartan Noir, and specifically the founding text of that popular brand of detective fiction, William McIlvanney’s Laidlaw, in light of the ontological theories of Martin Heidegger and Alain Badiou. The essay inverts the normative critical relationship between literature and theory, taking Laidlaw as an explanatory text for Heideggerian thought rather than the converse and in the process makes Heidegger’s influence seem like a reflex of genre fiction in its sheer conventionality, even its kitsch. Badiou’s ideas become useful here as they situate such conventionality relative to ideas of ‘state’ considered as a condition of being as well as a political entity. What, this essay asks, does Laidlaw tell us about the ‘state’ of the literary tradition within which it is embedded? And how might Laidlaw help us conceptualise the political state of Scotland?

    Matthew Wickman

    5/1

    2013

    John Burnside’s Living Nowhere as Industrial Fiction
    This article approaches Burnside’s novel from an unusual angle, arguing that its industrial theme is more than a subsidiary to the manifest ecological agenda, or one character’s search for authentic living. In its focus on two working-class families and their environment, and its powerful attention to factory life, Living Nowhere shares a number of features with the tradition of industrial fiction as it developed from early Victorian times. The novel’s distinctly new contribution to the genre lies in the far-reaching environmentalist sensibility challenging the practices of and assumptions behind an unchecked mode of industrial production. It shows environmental degradation at its source in a steel plant, its immediate impact on the workers’ bodies and souls, their habitations, family and community life, but it also alerts the reader to the hidden hazards of certain kinds of industrial production whose results may only become visible in some distant future.

    H. Gustav Klaus

    5/1

    2013

    Review Essay: Writers on Scottish Independence
    The contributors to Unstated: Writers on Scottish Independence are broadly in favour of political independence but nervous about the possible consequences of a resurgent nationalism. Many insist on the importance of Scotland’s taking responsibility for her own situation. Some see independence as a political question, others in terms of cultural confidence. The former would judge independence by Scotland’s subsequent political and cultural transformation; the latter more likely to treat independence as an end in itself. There is a particular tension in the book over claims that the Scots are naturally more predisposed to communal feeling than other nations.

    Alex Thomson

    5/1

    2013

    The Year’s Publications for 2012: A Selected List

    Alexander J. Cuthbert

    4/2

    2012

    Ana, Morgana, Morganiana: A Poet’s Scrapbooks as Emblems of Identity

    James McGonigal and Sarah Hepworth

    4/2

    2012

    Sustenance Provided: the Bibliographical Morgan

    Hamish Whyte

    4/2

    2012

    Publishing Edwin Morgan

    Robyn Marsack

    4/2

    2012

    From Edinburgh to Saturn: The Edwin Morgan Archive at the Scottish Poetry Library

    Greg Thomas

    4/2

    2012

    ‘Is this a poem? Do not lose it.’ – Edwin Morgan’s ‘The Ropemaker’s Bride’

    Richard Price

    4/2

    2012

    The Case of the Missing War: Edwin Morgan’s ‘The New Divan’

    David Kinloch

    4/2

    2012

    Experimenting with the Verbivocovisual: Edwin Morgan’s Early Concrete Poetry

    Eleanor Bell

    4/2

    2012

    While Crowding Memories Came: Edwin Morgan, Old English and Nostalgia

    Chris Jones

    4/2

    2012

    The Summer of Cyrano

    John Corbett

    4/2

    2012

    Reveille

    Robert Crawford

    4/2

    2012

    Book Reviews section

     

    4/1

    2012

    Eros and Self-Government: Petrarchism and Protestant Self-Abnegation in William Fowler’s Tarantula of Love

    Elizabeth Elliott

    4/1

    2012

    Second-Sighted Scot: Allan Ramsay and the South Sea Bubble

    Steve Newman

    4/1

    2012

    Speaking with a Double Voice: John Home’s Douglas and the Idea of Scotland

    Megan Stoner Morgan

    4/1

    2012

    Burns Manuscripts at Floors Castle: An Unpublished Letter and an Unpublished Draft of the Poem ‘On Seeing a Wounded Hare’

    David W. R. Purdie, Iain Gordon Brown and Gerard C. Carruthers

    4/1

    2012

    Class and Nation in Robert Huddleston’s Collected Works

    Gavin Falconer

    4/1

    2012

    ‘Like a downcast angel’: Harriet Martineau’s ‘Historiette’ of Mary, Queen of Scots

    Shu-Fang Lai

    4/1

    2012

    ‘What to naturalists is known as a Symbiosis’: Literature, Community and Nature in the Evergreen

    Koenraad Claes

    4/1

    2012

    J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon and Exploration

    Scott Lyall

    4/1

    2012

    The Writer as Tactician: James Kelman’s Everyday Practice

    Mitch Miller and Johnny Rodger

    4/1

    2012

    The Year’s Publications for 2011: A Selected List

    Alexander J. Cuthbert

    3/2

    2011

    ‘True Views of Scotland’: Illustrated Supplements to Sir Walter Scott’s Work

    Gina Opdycke Terry

    3/2

    2011

    Three New James Boswell Articles from The Public Advertiser, 1763

    James J. Caudle

    3/2

    2011

    Scott’s Early Love Poems to Williamina Belsches

    Lindsay Levy

    3/2

    2011

    Mungo Park, Man of Letters

    Karina Williamson and Mark Duffill

    3/2

    2011

    ‘Transitory Thresholds’: Geographic Imaginings of Adolescence in Women’s Fiction from North East Scotland

    Glenda Norquay

    3/2

    2011

    ‘Life’s Easy When You’re A Robot’: Exploring Reification through the Dual Narratives of Lanark

    Neil Rhind

    3/2

    2011

    Landscape Mindscape: Writing in Scotland’s Prehistoric Future

    Thomas Legendre

    3/2

    2011

    ‘The tilt from one parish / into another’: Estrangement, Continuity and Connection in the Poetry of John Burnside, Kathleen Jamie, and Robin Robertson

    David Borthwick

    3/2

    2011

    Environment, History, Literature: Materialism as Cultural Ecology in John Burnside’s ‘Four Quartets’

    Tom Bristow

    3/2

    2011

    Dialectics of Maps and Memory: James Robertson’s ‘Mythohistoriographical’ Art

    Martin Philip

    3/2

    2011

    Book Reviews section

     

    3/1

    2011

    Robert Burns’s ‘The Twa Dogs’: Ideological Aspects of Translation into Russian

    Natalia Kaloh Vid

    3/1

    2011

    A Sprinkling of Stage Scots: Robert Burns, Linguistic Stereotypes and Place

    Alex Broadhead

    3/1

    2011

    The Prism of Propaganda: Hugh MacDiarmid’s Modernism and the Belgian Literary Revival

    Sascha Bru

    3/1

    2011

    ‘ ’Tis Eighty Year Since’: Hugh MacDiarmid’s Late Reception in Poland

    Aniela Korzeniowska

    3/1

    2011

    The Grieves in Thakeham

    John Manson

    3/1

    2011

    An Undignified Beginning

    C. M. Grieve/Hugh MacDiarmid

    3/1

    2011

    ‘Places on the Map’: Rebecca West’s Modernist Journeys between Scotland and Europe

    Mariagiulia Garufi

    3/1

    2011

    Voicing Gaelic in English: Joseph Macleod’s The Men of the Rocks (1942) and the Emergence of ‘Adam Drinan’

    James Fountain

    3/1

    2011

    Letting the Writing Do the Talking: Denationalising English and James Kelman’s Translated Accounts

    Fabio L. Vericat

    3/1

    2011

    The Quest for Authenticity: History and Class in Ian Rankin’s Rebus Novels

    Kirsten Sandrock

    3/1

    2011

    The Year’s Publications for 2010: A Selected List

    Alexander J. Cuthbert

    2/2

    2010

    Edwin Morgan (1920–2010) ‘Cinquevalli’

    Edwin Morgan

    2/2

    2010

    Kenneth Buthlay (1926–2009)

    Alan Riach; David Robb; Margery Palmer McCulloch

    2/2

    2010

    Recreation and William Alexander’s Doomes-day (1637)

    Peter Auger

    2/2

    2010

    “A Lady of the Isles”: Margaret Chalmers’ Letters to Walter Scott and Two New Poems

    Penny Fielding

    2/2

    2010

    Ivanhoe: The Rebel Scott and the Soul of a Nation

    Joan Cooper

    2/2

    2010

    Robert Louis Stevenson’s Davos Studio: author and art in 1882

    Richard Hill

    2/2

    2010

    Collecting Islands: Compton Mackenzie and The Four Winds of Love

    Timothy Baker

    2/2

    2010

    The Invasion of the Homeland: Duncan McLean, Global Capital, and the Crisis of Masculinity

    Erich Hertz

    2/2

    2010

    Book Reviews section

     

    2/1

    2010

    Professor Douglas Mack, MA, PhD, FRSE: A Eulogy

    Roderick Watson

    2/1

    2010

    George Buchanan, Arthur Johnston, and William Laud

    Roger P.H. Green

    2/1

    2010

    ‘This Changeableness in Character’: Exploring Masculinity and Nationahood on James Boswell’s Grand Tour

    Richard de Ritter

    2/1

    2010

    Samuel Thomson’s Poetic Fashioning of the Ulster Landscape

    Jennifer Orr

    2/1

    2010

    Mirren’s Autobiography: The Life and Poetry of Marion Bernstein (1846–1906)

    Edward H. Cohen and Linda Fleming

    2/1

    2010

    ‘The More There is to See’: Another Look at James Kelman’s How Late It Was, How Late

    Stephannie S. Gearhart

    2/1

    2010

    Venders, Purchasers, Admirers: Burnsian ‘Men of Action’ from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century

    Corey E. Andrews

    2/1

    2010

    ‘What Was Become of Mr Burns‘ Children’: Jean Armour’s 1804 Letter to Maria Riddell, a New York Junk Shop, and Serendipity

    Valentina Bold and Nancy Groce

    2/1

    2010

    Robert Burns: Two Recent Discoveries Pertaining to his Freemasonic Associations

    A. J. Morton

    2/1

    2010

    Some Recent Discoveries in Robert Burns Studies

    Gerard Carruthers, Lindsay Levy, Helena Reilly, Julie Renfrew and Mark Wilson

    2/1

    2010

    Review Essay: The End of Biographies?

    Matthew Wickman

    2/1

    2010

    The Year’s Publications 2009: A Selected List

    Alexander J. Cuthbert

    1/2

    2009

    Treason, Sedition and Reform: The Scottish Trials and Joanna Baillie’s Ethwald

    Regina Hewitt

    1/2

    2009

    The Poets at his Feet: The Afterlife of ‘Sir Patrick Spens’

    Richard J. King

    1/2

    2009

    August Corrodi’s Translation of Burns

    J. Derrick McClure

    1/2

    2009

    Book Reviews section

     

    1/1

    2009

    ‘Whether Utility or Pleasure be the Principal Aim in View’: An Edinburgh Perspective on the Value of English Studies

    Susan Manning

    1/1

    2009

    A New Poem by Robert Semphill: The Warning to the Lordis

    Priscilla Bawcutt

    1/1

    2009

    Three Notes on King Orphius

    Emily Lyle

    1/1

    2009

    The Illustration of the Waverley Novels: Scott and Popular Illustrated Fiction

    Richard Hill

    1/1

    2009

    ‘Revisiting Orkney’

    Edwin Muir [In Memoriam 1887–1959]

    1/1

    2009

    The Poetry and Ideas of Kenneth White: A Perspective from France

    Pierre Jamet

    1/1

    2009

    Douglas Dunn’s Elegies: The Ethics and Impossibility of Mourning

    Iain Twiddy

    1/1

    2009

    Herbert’s Laurel and Crawford’s Burns: Disorders at the Borders of the Known Warld

    Jeffrey Skoblow

    1/1

    2009

    Scotland’s Authentic Plurality: The New Essentialism in Scottish Studies

    Gavin Miller

    1/1

    2009

    The Year’s Publications 2008: A Selected List

    Alexander J. Cuthbert

     

    Last updated 3 December 2014.