From the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

This text is a version of a passage from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. The Chronicle, which was begun during the laterpart of the reign of Alfred the Great, is an annalistic record of events since ancient times, compiled from the Bible, the writings of scholars like Bede, notes made in the margins of the mathematical tables used to calculate the date of Easter, and old traditions. A convenient translation of the Chronicle is by G N Garmonsway (Everyman).

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Anno 449.  Her Martianus and Valentinus onfengon rice, and ricsodon seofon winter.  And on hiera dagum Hengest and Horsa, fram Wyrtgeorne gelaþode, Bretta cyninge, gesohton Bretene on þæm stede þe is genemned Ypwines-fleot, ærest Brettum to fultume, ac hie eft on hie fuhton.  Se cyning het hie feohtan ongean Peohtas; and hie swa dydon, and sige hæfdon swa hwær swa hie comon.  Hie þa sendon to Angle, and heton him sendan maran fultum. Þa sendon hie him maran fultum. þa comon þa menn of þrim mægþum Germanie: of Ealdseaxum, of Englum, of Iotum.


Anno 455.  Her Hengest and Horsa fuhton wiþ Wyrtgeorne þæm cyninge in þære stowe þe is genemned Æglesþrep; and his broþor Horsan man ofslog.  And æfter þæm Hengest feng to rice, and Æsc his sunu.


Anno 457.  Her Hengest and Æsc fuhton wiþ Brettas in þære stowe þe is genemned Crecganford, and þær ofslogon feower þusend wera. þa forleton þa Brettas Centland, and mid micle ege flugon to Lundenbyrig.

Anno 449.  In this year [lit here] Martianus and Valentinus succeeded to [lit received] kingship, and ruled seven years.  And in their days Hengest and Horsa, invited by Vortigern, king of [the] Britons, came to Britain at the place which is called Ebbsfleet, first as a help to [the] Britons, but they afterwards fought against them.  The king commanded them to fight against [the] Picts; and they did so, and had victory wherever they came.  Then they sent to Angeln, and told them to send more help.  They then sent to them more help.  Then the men came from three tribes in Germany: from [the] Old Saxons, from [the] Angles, from [the] Jutes.

455.  In this year Hengest and Horsa fought against Vortigern the king in the place which is called Aylesford; and his brother Horsa was slain [lit one slew his brother Horsa].  And after that Hengest and Æsc his son succeeded to kingship [lit Hengest succeeded to kingship, and Æsc his son].


457.  In this year Hengest and Æsc fought against [the] Britons in the place which is called Crayford, and there slew four thousand men [lit of men].  The Britons then abandoned Kent, and with great fear fled to London.

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